Updating windows xp service pack 1

The limited-time approval technique works by limiting the number of SUS clients that see the Windows XP SP2 update on the list of approved updates when they contact the SUS server on any given day while this technique is in use, thereby controlling the number of clients that are serviced per day and limiting the server load and additional network overhead (retry attempts, etc.).The third set of options works by limiting the bandwidth used by the SUS implementation, thereby controlling the load on the server and the network.For the standard SUS machine (P700, 512 MB RAM, 100 Mbps network card), set the maximum concurrent connections to 100 and the maximum bandwidth for the SUS Web site to 80 Mbps.In this example, the value of 100 for maximum concurrent connections is an estimate for what the server machine can handle under heavy data transfer load conditions, given its CPU and memory capacity.You may monitor the SUS server using performance counters or the Task Manager and increase the length of the approval windows if you determine the load on your SUS server is not high.Increasing the length of the approval windows will allow more clients to download Windows XP SP2 on a daily basis and reduce the time required to update all your Windows XP machines, but increasing the windows beyond a certain threshold (which will vary due to unique factors in your environment) will cause server overload and unnecessary network overhead which will result in increasing rather than decreasing the time required to update all your Windows XP machines.SUS clients that contact the server outside this time period will not see the SP2 update in the list of approved updates on the SUS server and will therefore not attempt to download it.

SUS administrators can use the following formula to calculate the amount of time for which to approve the Windows XP SP2 update on each day: TA = Amount of time (in hours) the update needs to be marked as ‘approved’ on a given day NXP = Number of Windows XP systems to get SP2 via the SUS server NDE = Number of days since SP2 was first marked as approved on the SUS server For example, if there are 12000 Windows XP systems that need to get the Windows XP SP2 update via a SUS server, the calculation would work out as follows: For day 1, the update would need to be marked as approved for 2 hours, since Note: An important consideration for using this technique is to initiate the approval about 1 hour after the work day or shift starts, so the SUS server is not impacted by the spike in clients trying to download SP2 soon after they are turned on.This technique relies on the SUS administrator to approve and then un-approve the Windows XP SP2 update on the SUS server on a daily basis, until the number of Windows XP systems that have not received the SP2 update is less than 2000.Because the update is only approved for a limited time each day, only a subset of the SUS clients contacting the server on a given day will see the update marked as ‘approved’ and will attempt to download the update.Microsoft strongly urges customers with Windows XP and Windows XP Service Pack 1-based systems to update to Windows XP SP2 as soon as possible.As a best-practice approach to implementing a managed rollout of Windows XP SP2, customers are encouraged to use a corporate update management solution such as Systems Management Server (SMS) 2003 or Software Update Services (SUS).