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A 2005 vintage base ball game, played by 1886 rules.

Vintage games are live contests that seek to portray the authenticity of the early game.

The NABBP soon expanded into a true national organization, although most of the strongest clubs remained those based in the northeastern part of the country.

In its 12-year history as an amateur league, the Atlantic Club of Brooklyn won seven championships, establishing themselves as the first true dynasty in the sport, although Mutual of New York was widely considered to be one of the best teams of the era as well.

One of the significant rules prohibited soaking or plugging the runner; under older rules, a fielder could put a runner out by hitting the runner with the thrown ball, similarly to the common schoolyard game of kickball.

The Knickerbocker Rules required fielders to tag or force the runner, as is done today, and avoided a lot of the arguments and fistfights that resulted from the earlier practice.

Before the Civil War, baseball competed for public interest with cricket and regional variants of baseball, notably town ball played in Philadelphia and the Massachusetts Game played in New England.

The club was founded on September 23, 1845, as a social club for the upper middle classes of New York City, and was strictly amateur until it disbanded.

The club's by-laws committee, which included William R. Tucker, formulated the Knickerbocker Rules, which in large part dealt with organizational matters but which also laid out rules for playing the game.

(The term "reenactment" is a common misnomer; games are contested and not meant to recreate a specific historical event.) The history of baseball in the United States can be traced to the 19th century, when amateurs played a baseball-like game by their own informal rules using homemade equipment.

The popularity of the sport inspired the semi-pro national baseball clubs in the 1860s.